Basics


 fermentation Fermentation 

is a process driven by microorganisms. Microorganisms need fermentation to generate energy, build their “bodies” and to reproduce. Humans, at top of the food chain, utilizes fermentation primarily to preserve food, to avoid spoilage and enhance nutrition. Humans selectively use beneficial microorganisms to convert raw food stuffs to fermented products, which other microorganisms cannot further spoil. Fermentation can also increase palatability, nutrition and physiological functions, and decrease undesirable substances and functions. Cheese, soy sauce, Kefir, yogurt and other dairy products, pickles, some sausages, wine, and beer are among fermented foods which have sustained and enhanced our lives for many centuries. 

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Broth with parsley, dill and a wooden spoon top view

Bone Broth

Properly prepared, meat stocks are extremely nutritious, containing the minerals of bone, cartilage and marrow, (magnesium, potassium and calcium). Add vegetables (as electrolytes) and you have a food that is easily digested and absorbed. The gelatin formed from bone broth aids digestion and has been successfully used in the treatment of many intestinal disorders, including hyperacidity and Crohn’s disease. It acts as a ‘protein sparer’, allowing the body to more fully utilize the complete proteins being taken in. So, gelatin-rich broths are a must for those who cannot absorb large amounts of meat. Gelatin is useful in the treatment of many chronic disorders, including anemia (and other blood diseases), diabetes, muscular dystrophy, even morning sickness.

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KEFIR

 

KEFIR

One of the most probiotic foods known, great for healing ‘ leaky gut’ syndrome.

Rich in B12, magnesium, calcium, biotin, folate, K2, and enzymes this benefits our bodies by:

Supporting detox organs, improving digestion, building bone density, combating allergy symptoms, healing Inflammatory Bowel disease and Candida.

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Raw Dairy

Pasteurization does a lot to milk to rob it of its value to us as a source of good nutrition. From Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions:

Heat alters milk’s amino acids lysine and tyrosine, making the whole complex of proteins less available; it promotes rancidity of unsaturated fatty acids and destruction of vitamins. Vitamin C loss in pasteurization usually exceeds 50%; loss of other water-soluble vitamins can run as high as 80%; the Wulzen or anti-stiffness factor is totally destroyed as is vitamin B12, needed for healthy blood and a properly functioning nervous system. Pasteurization reduces the availability of milks mineral components, such as calcium, chloride, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and sulfur, as well as many trace minerals. There is some evidence that pasteurization alters lactose, making it more readily absorbable. This, and the fact that pasteurized milk puts an unnecessary strain on the pancreas to produce digestive enzymes, may explain why milk consumption in civilized societies has been linked with diabetes.

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 Kombucha

An elixir like no other, not a
tea, but a beneficiary of teas innate goodness, made from a
fungus ( that you can eat!) called a SCOBY; symbiotic culture of yeast and bacteria.
It is a variety of fermented, lightly effervescent beverages, made from the culture, sugar and Tea . It is a fully functioning food. Containing a colony of yeast and bacteria that interact together and ferment and become something else: a sweet and vinegary B vitamin and enzymes, probiotics and high concentrations of acetic, glauconite and lactic acids. It is this magic mix that gets to claim it’s super.

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